A lot of floating “crap” here — Players at a floating craps table in the Sands Hotel Pool — Las Vegas, 1954

A lot of floating “crap” here — Players at a floating craps table in the Sands Hotel Pool — Las Vegas, 1954

One of Hollywood’s most enduring marriages began on January 29, 1958, when Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward wed in Las Vegas, Nevada. The actors met in New York City while performing in the Broadway production of Picnic, a romantic drama. Following the success of the play both Newman and Woodward moved to Los Angeles where they both became contract players.

Following their marriage in 1958 the couple traveled to London where they honeymooned at the Connaught Hotel. Woodward essentially dropped out of the entertainment industry to be Newman’s wife, but in 1968 she starred in Rachel, Rachel, Newman’s directorial debut.

Woodward received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress, one of four total nominations that the film received. Newman told the press that he directed the movie for her after she gave up her career for him.

The Las Vegas of the 1950s was nothing like the Vegas of today. Sure, there was gambling and wild shows, but when the city of sin first came about it was a place where inhibitions disappeared and people let their cares (and money) disappear.

This floating craps table in a swimming pool is indicative of the “anything goes” mindset of Vegas in the ’50s. Want to lose your money in a pool? Why not? Who cares how much you’re down as long as you’ve got a cold drink in your hand and some babes in your line of sight.

Located at the historic Sands Hotel and Casino, this was the place to be for high rollers and lowlifes, and as long as there was money to burn it didn’t matter which one you were.

Pretty in pink, Jaclyn Smith, 1976

No other Angel lasted longer than Jaclyn Smith. In the 1970s she joined Farrah Fawcett and Kate Jackson to form the trio of the all-female team of detectives who solved crimes with the help of their disembodied employer. The series had sex appeal and a progressive thrust that helped it attain legendary status in just a few short years.

Smith says that from the moment that the series went on the air that it was a hit and her life changed forever, something that she hadn’t fathomed. Continue reading A lot of floating “crap” here — Players at a floating craps table in the Sands Hotel Pool — Las Vegas, 1954