‘The Worst Person in the World’ review: Expect this dramedy to score big at Oscar time

‘The Worst Person in the World’ review: Expect this dramedy to score big at Oscar time

Released in U.S. theaters this week, “The Worst Person in the World” is not to be missed. Not if you want to see director-co-screenwriter Joachim Trier reinvent the romcom and introduce a captivating new star in Renate Reinsve whose livewire performance is sublime in every detail.

Expect this scintillating sensation from Norway to score big at Oscar time. Reinsve already won the Best Actress prize at Cannes. And why should she and Trier’s movie stop there? They have magic to do that will leave you dazed and dazzled in ways you can’t predict.

Julie’s unexpected pregnancy and shocking news about Aksel spark a reunion between the former lovers that typifies Trier’s brilliance at showing how life laughs at our plans to control it

Reinsve plays Julie, a modern woman about to turn 30 who swerves from career choices-medicine, psychology, writing, photography-and men who try to fit her into boxes-wife, mother, nurturer, sexual playmate-she thinks of as traps.

Julie is a whirling dervish living on a hunch and a hope, too much of a moving target to be pinned down. And yet the first and final images of the movie find her as still as a statue-one on a terrace overlooking nighttime Oslo, the last contemplating photos she’s just taken of an actress similarly struck with paralyzing doubt.

Like a novel, the film is divided into 12 chapters with a prologue and epilogue, all tracing Julie’s four-year journey toward a goal just out of reach. For men, indecision is often portrayed as romantic yearning. For women, it unfairly implies an immaturity meant to guilt Julie into thinking she’s the worst person in the world. Continue reading ‘The Worst Person in the World’ review: Expect this dramedy to score big at Oscar time